The Adolphus Hotel – Finale Post


I’d liken this post to the finale in a 4th of July fireworks celebration.  The best is saved for last, with a battery of colorful fireworks in the night sky.  But even as you’re mesmerized by the profusion of color, in the back of your mind you’re thinking about having to return to work the next day (it always seems like the 4th of July is in the middle of the week!).

All good things (including my fun-to-write-and-share) blog series on The Adolphus must come to an end.  But until we reach that point at the bottom of this post, enjoy my final selection of photos.  Some are gratuitous and perhaps the entire post is a bit off the rails. But it is the finale, after all.  Enjoy the experience!


This is my favorite photo.  I’m standing in my Baker Hotel bellhop jacket, wearing a hat my mom made.  An hour before Tore picked me up that day, I figured out how to sew the embellishment on the hat.  The background shows where the Baker Hotel was located.

The two images below show the same charming nook, just from different perspectives.

Highlights:  I love the tile floor and the blue chairs.

I’m a detail person that loves to document everything.  The photo below shows the artwork leading to my room.

This tray of goodies was waiting for me when I returned to my room in the evening.  One guess is that my stow-away guests (more on this later) in my luggage ordered room service.  But my friend Tore had the same tray in his room.   Everything was delicious.  I still think about those shortbread cookies.

Most of you are aware I have unusual hobbies.  Among them, I collect creepy ventriloquist dolls and periodically take them on trips for unusual photo opportunities.  Of course, I took them to The Adolphus.

Winthrop Marling III made himself comfortable at the desk.

Mortimer Hines found this book on the side table and read it to Percival Sunshine.  (Also can you imagine the reaction the staff must have had when they placed the framed photo and card on the side table while I was at dinner!)

It should be noted very delicately, that way back in the day, there were clubs near The Adolphus Hotel.  The clubs had vaudeville acts, including ventriloquists.  It made sense I bring the creepy dolls to experience the creepy history.  Fortunately, all three deny having a sketchy past.

It should also be noted, with all the ghost story articles I had read about the hotel, I was a little concerned the dolls might suddenly find a voice and send me screaming out of my room.  😉

 


Below is a shot in front of the hotel after dinner.  Given I am amassing old postcards that show The Adolphus during various time periods, I wanted to take my own “postcard” with my friend Tore in it.  Someday people will be studying the details of this photo with great interest. 😉  Of course, the attire will throw them off.  Most people don’t dress up anymore.  In fact, when we were walking outside complete strangers of various ages complimented us.

 


I have favorite songs that have become anthems that get me through bad days as well as triumphant days— and everything in between. These songs have intertwined with my Adolphus Hotel photos and memories. When I need to be transported far away, I look at my photos. I listen to my anthems. And just like that, I’m at The Adolphus. I’m at The French Room, eating filet and a chocolate soufflé.

During regular commutes through Harry Hines Blvd, I’m actually at the Adolphus Hotel, in a calm, courteous and safe environment.

When I need to keep my reactions in check, I imagine how the professionals at The Adolphus Hotel would react. Then I laugh because I know they’d tell me to run as fast as I can… back to them.

Most recently I imagined myself dancing a foxtrot to my favorite song. But since the song isn’t a foxtrot and probably not really all that danceable, I imagine my best success would be an ethereal dance with a ghost, some former guest of the hotel. With that imagery we are both graceful and light on our feet. My ballgown twirls as I turn and my head tilts at just the right time. (The imagery is everything that I am not!)

This leads to my next bit of news. I’m returning to The Adolphus in May. I will find a way to dance, even if for just a few seconds without music with my friend Tore. (We will dance discretely. No one will be disturbed. We won’t get ourselves kicked out of the hotel). We will dance a foxtrot in honor of passed guests. And I want the memory of saying I danced with Tore at The Adolphus. Imagine how many months I’ll be talking about that experience! I’m already thinking about the perfect dress and hat.

 

The photo below highlights the grandeur of the chandelier, the ironwork and even the elegant gold escalators.  If you go up one floor it leads to a possible spot where one might discreetly dance a foxtrot.  I could be mistaken but the look on Tore’s face says, “shall we dance?”

This is one of the many areas we wandered during our visit.  It is also a good spot to dance a foxtrot.

 


When you add it all up, the expense of staying at The Adolphus was an absolute drop in the bucket. The experience was priceless. The memories are gold. My stories and photos are treasures.

Knowing I was able to comport myself and make friends while letting my eccentricities peek through forever puts a smile on my face.

Mr. Milke, I’m coming home.

Unless I come up with another reason to ramble about my February visit, this concludes my series.  Thank you for reading and going on the adventure.

In the event you just tuned in, I have 3 other posts about The Adolphus.  Each one will take you on a different journey.

 

Thank you, to the Adolphus Hotel, for everything.

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